Emerging threats to food authenticity

Sterling Crew, Chair of The Food Authenticity Network Advisory Board, is set to speak at Highfield’s ‘Building Trust in Food Supply Chains’ conference on the critical topic of emerging risks and threats to food authenticity.

The conference will take place on 9 June at the National Motorcycle Museum in Solihull, Birmingham and is expected to attract over 200 food safety professionals from around the globe.

Sterling is well known in the industry, with 35 years’ experience in national and international food safety, authenticity governance, sustainability and regulation. He started his career in government before a successful track history in retailing with Marks and Spencer and Tesco. Sterling’s experience as a regulator, retailer, brand owner and food manufacturer has given him a unique perspective of the authenticity challenges in the global food supply network.

‘The prevention of food fraud is paramount to ensure we protect the trust of our consumers and to maintain fair, sustainable business practices’ – Sterling Crew.

The purpose of his presentation at the Highfield conference will be to guide food operators through approaches and processes that can be adopted by supply chains to improve their resilience against food fraud.

Food fraud costs the global food industry an estimated US$40 billion a year, not to mention the immeasurable loss of consumer confidence when incidents are brought to light.

Food fraud can harm consumers, causing illness and even death. This was the case in 2008 when melamine was used as a nitrogen source to fraudulently increase the measured protein content of milk.  After consuming the contaminated infant formula, more than 50,000 babies were hospitalised and 6 deaths were recorded.

Food fraud is an age-old problem that reoccurs in global food supply chains. Since the 2013 global issue of the fraudulent replacement of horsemeat in beef products, there is a worldwide consensus that as well as being better at detecting food fraud, more needs to be done to prevent food fraud from happening in the first place.

During his presentation, Sterling will look at the common factors in a number of recent cases, how these factors could have been mitigated and how to assure the authenticity of food by minimising vulnerability to fraud. He will address specific mitigation strategies and examine selected risk mitigation measures aimed at preventing food fraud in supply chains.

Sterling will also cover the role played by the Food Authenticity Network in bringing together global information on food authenticity testing, food fraud mitigation and food supply chain integrity, all in one convenient location.

For more information on other speakers at the Highfield conference and on topics to be discussed, or to book your early-bird ticket,  go to highfieldconference.com.

 

 

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